artlog:

Ziggy Stardust Comes to Town

If you haven’t noticed yet, the traditional form of museum exhibition design is slowly fading away.  Over the last few years, art institutions have foregone the bright white walls set in an open forum for a maze of dark rooms full of projections mapped on mannequins.  While at first it can be exciting to experience art presented with tech, the gimmick can quickly rise to the surface and a rolling of eyes can commence. 

But when an artist is presented by the Victoria and Albert museum of London, and that artist is David Bowie of… well… outer space, who knows what our eager little eyes may see? 

 ”32”Photos: Nathan Keay, © MCA Chicago

Opened just last week at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago— the traveling exhibit “David Bowie is” shares hundreds of objects owned, authored, or employed by one of the most influential eccentrics in the pop art world.  This highly anticipated exhibit even also boasts a follow-up documentary directed by Hamish Hamilton, which will first be released internationally in November.

While true—as spoken by Steve Johnson of the Chicago Tribune— the exhibition does not touch on every obvious point (mainly the lulls) of Bowie’s career, it does provide a window for those who did not live through the period of his coke spoon days.

After the Chicago exhibit closes January 4, 2015, it will reopen in Paris from the beginning of March to the end of May before it moves on to Australia, and The Netherlands.  Further venues will be announced in the near future.  

-Becca Gore

dtxmcclain:

It’s time you tumbled, Pacific Fabric, April 1948

pixography:

Frida Kahlo

pixography:

Frida Kahlo

Alexander Babayan

Composition #10

Oil on canvas60 x 50 (2013)

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  1. Camera: Nikon D3200
  2. Aperture: f/4
  3. Exposure: 1/30th
  4. Focal Length: 28mm

likeafieldmouse:

Mark Rothko - No. 3/No. 13 (1949)

pixography:

Pablo Picasso ~ “Bust of a woman and self-portrait”

pixography:

Pablo Picasso ~ “Bust of a woman and self-portrait”