Alexander Babayan

Composition #10

Oil on canvas60 x 50 (2013)

facebook // instagram // artfinder // artmajeur

  1. Camera: Nikon D3200
  2. Aperture: f/4
  3. Exposure: 1/30th
  4. Focal Length: 28mm

likeafieldmouse:

Mark Rothko - No. 3/No. 13 (1949)

pixography:

Pablo Picasso ~ “Bust of a woman and self-portrait”

pixography:

Pablo Picasso ~ “Bust of a woman and self-portrait”

undiegirl:

Based on James Dashner’s best selling novel and starring Teen Wolf’s very own breakout babe Dylan O’Brien - The Maze Runner is the latest YA dystopian novel to get The Hunger Games treatment. Fans of the series are probably shouting at me to not make comparisons, but lets face it, if it weren’t for The Hungers Games this movie would not have been made. But I guess if I was a fan of The Maze Runner I wouldn’t want it compared to The Hunger Games either because the fact is it’s just not as good. That said, The Maze Runner is still pretty entertaining and worth seeing on the big screen for the action sequences alone… Also Dylan O’Brien. 
- Something Resembling a Review of The Maze Runner

I undiegirl:

Based on James Dashner’s best selling novel and starring Teen Wolf’s very own breakout babe Dylan O’Brien - The Maze Runner is the latest YA dystopian novel to get The Hunger Games treatment. Fans of the series are probably shouting at me to not make comparisons, but lets face it, if it weren’t for The Hungers Games this movie would not have been made. But I guess if I was a fan of The Maze Runner I wouldn’t want it compared to The Hunger Games either because the fact is it’s just not as good. That said, The Maze Runner is still pretty entertaining and worth seeing on the big screen for the action sequences alone… Also Dylan O’Brien. 
- Something Resembling a Review of The Maze Runner

I

undiegirl:

Based on James Dashner’s best selling novel and starring Teen Wolf’s very own breakout babe Dylan O’Brien - The Maze Runner is the latest YA dystopian novel to get The Hunger Games treatment. Fans of the series are probably shouting at me to not make comparisons, but lets face it, if it weren’t for The Hungers Games this movie would not have been made. But I guess if I was a fan of The Maze Runner I wouldn’t want it compared to The Hunger Games either because the fact is it’s just not as good. That said, The Maze Runner is still pretty entertaining and worth seeing on the big screen for the action sequences alone… Also Dylan O’Brien. 

Something Resembling a Review of The Maze Runner

I

heathwest:

Gerhard Richter Fondation Beyeler, Basel, 2014 heathwest:

Gerhard Richter Fondation Beyeler, Basel, 2014 heathwest:

Gerhard Richter Fondation Beyeler, Basel, 2014 heathwest:

Gerhard Richter Fondation Beyeler, Basel, 2014 heathwest:

Gerhard Richter Fondation Beyeler, Basel, 2014

heathwest:

Gerhard Richter 
Fondation Beyeler, Basel, 2014

everyartisthasabday:

This is Sol LeWitt’s only 3D Wall Drawing. The story goes that he was invited to exhibit in Japan, but when he arrived, he was given 4 pegboard walls that he couldn’t alter. Typically he paints over a wall, so he had to come up with a new idea idea on the spot. That new idea was rolling 40,000 pieces of tissue paper and inserting them into the pegboard’s holes.

(Wall Drawing 38, 1970)

  1. Camera: LG Electronics VX-8550

artnet:

We asked 20 women in the art world, "Is the art world biased?"


Here’s what they said.

pixography:

Jackson Pollock ~ “Number 8”, 1949

It has been suggested that Jackson Pollock was influenced by Native American sand paintings, made by trickling thin lines of colored sand onto a horizontal surface. It was not until 1947 that Pollock began his “action” paintings, influenced by Surrealist ideas of  “psychic automatism” (direct expression of the unconscious). Pollock would fix his canvas to the floor and drip paint from a can using a variety of objects to manipulate the paint. Jackson  Pollock wanted an end to the viewer’s search for representational elements in his paintings, thus he abandoned titles and started numbering the paintings instead. Of this, Pollock commented: “…look passively and try to receive what the painting has to offer and not bring a subject matter or preconceived idea of what they are to be looking for.” Pollock’s wife, Lee Krasner, said Pollock “used to give his pictures conventional titles… but now he simply numbers them. Numbers are neutral. They make people look at a picture for what it is - pure painting.” <source>